Tag Archives: Law on bullying

Priti Patel and bullying: what is the law?

Can a person whose behaviour constitutes bullying really be exonerated if there was “no intention” to bully, as the case of Priti Patel, UK Home Secrtary, suggests? The answer is fundamentally no – but overwhelmingly, yes, since workplace bullies throughout the country claim this defence in disciplinary proceedings – and usually successfully when their management is willing to give them the benefit of the doubt.

Can the bully be exonerated because she is working in a “challenging” job with people resistent to change, as Patel claimed? Again the answer is no. If you resort to bullying in these circumstances that would be bullying as a technique of management – and hence intentional; or you’ve simply lost it and should be moved from your post or at the very least get some retraining. But again the answer is “yes” since blaming the victims is always a good ploy for a manager facing a sympathetic disciplinary chair.

One hesitates to say that the Patel bullying scandal has set back the rights of employees making bullying allegations since the two excuses – “I didn’t mean it” and “they drove me to it” are standard tropes when such allegations are made. They have no basis in logic or law yet employers use them to find against staff making bullying claims or mitigate the offence to the extent that throwing in a bit of anger management is deemed sufficient to show something is being done.

The prime minister, Boris Johnson, is in the lucky position of having arbitrary powers under the Ministerial Code to throw out allegations however well founded. Employers have to show themselves acting more fairly and rationally in such cases and must have somewhat stricter codes of conduct, anti-bullying policies and disciplinary procedures. Nevertheless, whatever the rules, the complainant is at a disadvantage whenever an employer backs a bullying manager. Continue reading

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